Falling Short

In the last post, we talked about getting it together. That is getting all of the things that you need in order so you can focus on being creative. Those being the needs that you have that need to be fulfilled. Things like your Physiological Needs, your safety needs, your esteem needs all need to be addressed. Where we fall short is when these needs fall short. In the sermons, speeches, seminars and the like, falling short is not something that is explored. In this context we can define falling short as when one of these needs, these essential pillars of development, are not longer properly supporting you.


Think of it like building a house. You can have all the creative potential in the world, or a simple spark of an idea. If the foundation of your creative development and exploration is not sound, or if it is now unsteady, the house, no matter how beautiful, will suffer. No matter what anyone tells you, there are no quick fixes. You can just have this need replaced with something. We need time, to learn to trust what has been inserted. When you have a new door installed in your house, you play with it for a while. You have to have time to admire it, open it ,close it, test its rigidity, test this, see about that, and so on. There are dozens of things that you will do to this door before you trust it as a common staple in your life. This door, after the commercials, the specials, signs and the salesmen, will have to earn your trust before you can move to a place where you don't think about if it will do the job.


So is the same with anything that is replaced in your life. If you loose a someone from one of your social circles, you will notice it. If you were to become sick or have something feel different about your body, you will notice it. If you where to change jobs or to have start a new business on your way to financial security, your creativity will reflect tat. Just adding a new person, a new job, a quick pain pill (or to extend the metaphor adding a new door) will get us back on track. We have to be aware of this change and understand that we need to trust it before we can get back to our creative best.


One good example of this is that something that happen to me when I first started on my photography journey. I was excited about taking photos. The early work that I was producing was something in which I took a lot of pride. I could see images literally everywhere. On the street, in my home, in stores, during the day during the night. I was shooting everywhere and loving it. My work however didn't feel like I was getting any better. From the time the shutter closed to the time that the work as produced, it felt like there was something missing. I was shooting, editing and getting more and more disappointed with the work was I producing. The process reached a point where I was so frustrated that I put the



In fact it was not until I look back and I see that it was something in my marriage that needed to be addressed that I took to picking up the camera pressing the shutter again. Instead of shooting people places and random things, I took to images of cars with a slow shutter speed. This gave a new life in to my photography and introduced my work in to many people.




Those images gave me a new sense of what I was able to capture and what I was able to imagine I could do with my photography. No addressing this issue was not easy. No, it did not happen over night. No, it's not perfect. I am learning to trust the solution, so I can get back to the business of taking photos.



This is something that we all need to do. We all need to look at our support and determine if it is something that needs to be serviced or if it is something that needs to be replaced. When it needs to be replaced, we need time to allow the replacement to earn our trust. It is only after the trust of this replacement is earned that we can get back to the business of what was enjoy doing.



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Baltimore, MD, USA

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